Keltenmuseum Hochdorf/Enz

Ein Jahrhundertfund und sein Museum

 


The Museum

The Hochdorf/Enz Celtic Museum is a local museum operated by the Eberdingen township.
It opened May 25, 1991.


The museum is dedicated to the Hochdorf early Celtic princely grave with its unique discoveries and
finds from the time of 540 BC. The extent of the lessons learned about the lifestyle of Hallstatt princes obtained from the scientific research of this exceptional burial is clearly presented by the museum.
In the modern style of its form the museum structure incorporates elements of the mound design.
A metal arch 60 m (200 ft) across and 6 m (20 ft) tall extends above the building displaying the
original measurements of the monumental grave mound. The burial chamber itself is located, as
found by the excavations, underground in the center of the mound design. 

 













A Splendid Burial Rises Again: From Excavation to Reconstruction


 

The high point of the museum visit is seeing the prince’s completely reconstructed burial
chamber with its sumptuous décor. The burial chamber and grave offerings were reconstructed
with “ancient” tools and handicraft techniques in materials identical to the originals.
The presentation conveys – unlike the original finds – an authentic impression of the burial
2500 years ago. 

It is thanks to the metal artisan, Gerhard Längerer, that the bronze and iron reconstructions
are true to the original processes. From textile fragment to completed weave: Johanna Banck
duplicating the tablett weave from the burial chamber. The Museum Tour During a tour the
visitor finds answers to questions: How does archaeology work? How did humans live in early
Celtic times? What do the discoveries say about the daily life of the population, their economic
and social relationships?  A 25-minute multivision show explains the discovery history, the
excavations, and the princely burials around Hohenasperg. In a 20-minute film the metal artisan,
Gerhard Längerer, explains the work methods of an Iron Age blacksmith.






From textile fragment to completed weave:
Johanna Banck duplicating the tablett weave from the burial chamber.



The Museum Tour

 

During a tour the visitor finds answers to questions: How does archaeology work?
How did humans live in early Celtic times? What do the discoveries say about the daily life
of the population, their economic and social relationships? A 25-minute multivision show
explains the discovery history, the excavations, and the princely burials around Hohenasperg.
In a 20-minute film the metal artisan, Gerhard Längerer, explains the work methods of an
Iron Age blacksmith.